Search Price Results
Wish

LOT 124

1998 RUF BTR

[ translate ]

Chassis No. W09TD0364WPR06013

Having inherited control of his father's eponymous garage in Pfaffenhausen, near Munich, Germany as long ago as 1974, Alois Ruf launched his first improved Porsche 911–one based on the incumbent 930 Turbo–the following year. By 1977, his nascent company had unveiled an enlarged, 3.3-liter version of the car which, at that stage, was still only available in production form powered by a 3.0-liter engine. Interestingly, RUF simultaneously developed a five-speed transmission of their own design, which was also fitted to their Turbo derivative; this a technical improvement which Porsche themselves would not be inclined to fit on the Turbo until 1989.

Significantly, in 1982 RUF received formal recognition as an independent vehicle manufacturer from Germany's Federal Motor Transport Office; thus, enabling the company to issue their own chassis numbers as opposed to merely using those issued by Porsche, as had been the case previously. Production of the 930-based RUF BTR commenced in 1983, the car's increased 3.4-liter capacity and 370 horsepower being determining factors in its securing of the Production Car Speed record–at a speed of some 190 mph–later that year.

The BTR would continue to hold the speed record for three years until it was usurped, perhaps fittingly, by a Porsche: the mighty 959. Yet the 959 would hold the title only briefly, for RUF had been developing their new 911 Carrera 3.2-based CTR “Yellowbird” in the meantime; the 463 horsepower behemoth subsequently regaining the title in 1987 for the diminutive Bavarian manufacturer with a staggering top speed of some 213 mph.

Production of the BTR would carry on for the next decade or more. In 1993, the company's BTR 3.8 model was unveiled, the car effectively a 410 horsepower, turbocharged version of the 964-shape Carrera 2. Featuring a novel six-speed automatic transmission with electronic clutch, it continued to employ the manufacturer's tried-and-tested philosophy of maximizing power while minimizing weight and aerodynamic drag; something amply reflected in its 0-60 mph time of just 3.6 seconds and a top speed of 199 mph.

Just a year after the introduction of the BTR 3.8, another new model was introduced; this time based around the architecture of the newly introduced 993-generation bodyshell and, specifically, that of the Carrera variant. Continuing the BTR name, the Carrera-based 3.6-liter engine was equipped with a single KKK K27 turbocharger operating at a maximum boost of 11.6 psi, a bespoke air-to-air intercooler, modified camshafts and a Bosch Motronic Engine Management system. Maximum power was 420 horsepower at just 5,000 rpm, while maximum torque produced was a no less healthy 435 foot-pounds at 4,800 rpm.

However, impressive though its technical specification was, perhaps the most significant aspect of the BTR was that it effectively offered a 993-shape Porsche 911 Turbo–in all but name–almost two years before Porsche themselves did the same. Not for the first time, RUF had stolen a march on their Stuttgart neighbors. Elsewhere, the car employed the by-now customary RUF-developed six-speed manual transmission, a limited-slip differential, and suspension lowered by over an inch relative to the BTR 3.8. Performance was predictably meteoric, with 60 mph achieved in just 4.1 seconds and a top speed of 191 mph.

In common with many bespoke manufacturers, RUF have – in their case, for almost five decades - forged a justified reputation for microscopic attention to detail and their unwavering commitment to tailoring their cars to the individual requirements of their clients. Indeed, two cars of the same model may occasionally display minor cosmetic and even minor mechanical differences. This would appear to be the case with the magnificent example offered here, for while it retains the 3.6-liter single turbo engine of a BTR, these have been incorporated into the slightly more aggressive body of RUF's concurrent Turbo R model; the latter identifiable by the triple “gills” recessed into its front and rear bumpers.

Nevertheless, chassis number 06013 remains exquisitely presented in Adria Blue with a Mocca Brown leather interior with matching blue stitching and retains all the delightful bespoke details associated with RUF. These include – but are not restricted to – its milled aluminium pedals, RUF-branded door kick plates, machined front strut brace and its original 18 inch wheels. Furthermore, its specification is further enhanced by a power-operated sunroof and a Harman Kardon audio system; the latter with a remote CD autochanger located in the front luggage area.

This car was acquired by the consignor around 10 years ago still, remarkably, showing only delivery mileage; its seats and interior evidently having barely been occupied. In the current ownership, the car has continued to be fastidiously stored and maintained; its odometer at the time of cataloging displaying just 331 miles.

Forever associated with the Porsche name, yet justifiably now revered as a manufacturer in their own right, RUF remains one of the most remarkable stories of the performance car sector in recent times. Highly innovative, expertly skilled and commendably reactive, they have produced some of the fastest and most potent purpose-built GT cars ever constructed; their manufacturing processes a byword for intelligent design, exquisite engineering and impeccable levels of finish. In the case of the magnificent example offered here, it remains uniquely original and unmarked in its presentation, ultra-low mileage, and one of only ten such examples believed to have been produced; three primary criteria which underly its remarkable collector potential and all but guaranteed future appeal.

[ translate ]

View it on
Sale price
Unlock
Estimate
Unlock
Time
01 Mar 2024
Auction House
Unlock

[ translate ]

Chassis No. W09TD0364WPR06013

Having inherited control of his father's eponymous garage in Pfaffenhausen, near Munich, Germany as long ago as 1974, Alois Ruf launched his first improved Porsche 911–one based on the incumbent 930 Turbo–the following year. By 1977, his nascent company had unveiled an enlarged, 3.3-liter version of the car which, at that stage, was still only available in production form powered by a 3.0-liter engine. Interestingly, RUF simultaneously developed a five-speed transmission of their own design, which was also fitted to their Turbo derivative; this a technical improvement which Porsche themselves would not be inclined to fit on the Turbo until 1989.

Significantly, in 1982 RUF received formal recognition as an independent vehicle manufacturer from Germany's Federal Motor Transport Office; thus, enabling the company to issue their own chassis numbers as opposed to merely using those issued by Porsche, as had been the case previously. Production of the 930-based RUF BTR commenced in 1983, the car's increased 3.4-liter capacity and 370 horsepower being determining factors in its securing of the Production Car Speed record–at a speed of some 190 mph–later that year.

The BTR would continue to hold the speed record for three years until it was usurped, perhaps fittingly, by a Porsche: the mighty 959. Yet the 959 would hold the title only briefly, for RUF had been developing their new 911 Carrera 3.2-based CTR “Yellowbird” in the meantime; the 463 horsepower behemoth subsequently regaining the title in 1987 for the diminutive Bavarian manufacturer with a staggering top speed of some 213 mph.

Production of the BTR would carry on for the next decade or more. In 1993, the company's BTR 3.8 model was unveiled, the car effectively a 410 horsepower, turbocharged version of the 964-shape Carrera 2. Featuring a novel six-speed automatic transmission with electronic clutch, it continued to employ the manufacturer's tried-and-tested philosophy of maximizing power while minimizing weight and aerodynamic drag; something amply reflected in its 0-60 mph time of just 3.6 seconds and a top speed of 199 mph.

Just a year after the introduction of the BTR 3.8, another new model was introduced; this time based around the architecture of the newly introduced 993-generation bodyshell and, specifically, that of the Carrera variant. Continuing the BTR name, the Carrera-based 3.6-liter engine was equipped with a single KKK K27 turbocharger operating at a maximum boost of 11.6 psi, a bespoke air-to-air intercooler, modified camshafts and a Bosch Motronic Engine Management system. Maximum power was 420 horsepower at just 5,000 rpm, while maximum torque produced was a no less healthy 435 foot-pounds at 4,800 rpm.

However, impressive though its technical specification was, perhaps the most significant aspect of the BTR was that it effectively offered a 993-shape Porsche 911 Turbo–in all but name–almost two years before Porsche themselves did the same. Not for the first time, RUF had stolen a march on their Stuttgart neighbors. Elsewhere, the car employed the by-now customary RUF-developed six-speed manual transmission, a limited-slip differential, and suspension lowered by over an inch relative to the BTR 3.8. Performance was predictably meteoric, with 60 mph achieved in just 4.1 seconds and a top speed of 191 mph.

In common with many bespoke manufacturers, RUF have – in their case, for almost five decades - forged a justified reputation for microscopic attention to detail and their unwavering commitment to tailoring their cars to the individual requirements of their clients. Indeed, two cars of the same model may occasionally display minor cosmetic and even minor mechanical differences. This would appear to be the case with the magnificent example offered here, for while it retains the 3.6-liter single turbo engine of a BTR, these have been incorporated into the slightly more aggressive body of RUF's concurrent Turbo R model; the latter identifiable by the triple “gills” recessed into its front and rear bumpers.

Nevertheless, chassis number 06013 remains exquisitely presented in Adria Blue with a Mocca Brown leather interior with matching blue stitching and retains all the delightful bespoke details associated with RUF. These include – but are not restricted to – its milled aluminium pedals, RUF-branded door kick plates, machined front strut brace and its original 18 inch wheels. Furthermore, its specification is further enhanced by a power-operated sunroof and a Harman Kardon audio system; the latter with a remote CD autochanger located in the front luggage area.

This car was acquired by the consignor around 10 years ago still, remarkably, showing only delivery mileage; its seats and interior evidently having barely been occupied. In the current ownership, the car has continued to be fastidiously stored and maintained; its odometer at the time of cataloging displaying just 331 miles.

Forever associated with the Porsche name, yet justifiably now revered as a manufacturer in their own right, RUF remains one of the most remarkable stories of the performance car sector in recent times. Highly innovative, expertly skilled and commendably reactive, they have produced some of the fastest and most potent purpose-built GT cars ever constructed; their manufacturing processes a byword for intelligent design, exquisite engineering and impeccable levels of finish. In the case of the magnificent example offered here, it remains uniquely original and unmarked in its presentation, ultra-low mileage, and one of only ten such examples believed to have been produced; three primary criteria which underly its remarkable collector potential and all but guaranteed future appeal.

[ translate ]
Sale price
Unlock
Estimate
Unlock
Time
01 Mar 2024
Auction House
Unlock