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Bindu-Peace

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PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF PINAKIN PATEL

Acrylic on canvas
1998
39 1/4 × 39 3/8 in. (99.8 × 100 cm.)

Signed and dated ‘RAZA ’98’ lower centre, signed, dated and inscribed ‘RAZA / 1998 / “Bindu-Peace” / 100 X 100 cm / Acrylic on Canvas’ and further titled in Devanagari on reverse

PROVENANCE:
Apparao Galleries, Chennai.

‘Now I am conceiving the bindu in white, as I had seen it recently inscribed on the forehead of a woman in India. Distilled in clarity, pure and luminous, this will be Shanti Bindu.’ (Artist Statement, ‘Bindu: The Point’, Bindu: Space and Time in Raza’s Vision, New Delhi, 1997, p. 129)

Over his seven-decade long career, Sayed Haider Raza’s primary concern began with and continued as an exploration of nature. While his work saw a series of compositional changes toward non-representational abstraction, this shift was not a rejection of his earlier practice, but a deliberate movement towards a new form of expression deeply rooted in the spiritual and creative essence of India. ‘It was a condensation of nature into its vital parts, its very essence as a ‘final supreme and universal viewing of nature, not as appearance, not as spectacle but as an integrated force of life and cosmic growth reflected in every elementary particle and in every fibre of a human being’.’ (Anne Macklin, SH Raza: Catalogue Raisonné 1972-1989 (Volume II), New Delhi, 2022, p. 9)

Raza was always interested in the spiritual implications of the ‘seed.’ He states, ‘I was a landscape painter. With time I realised that nature, in which I was interested, has its real energy in the seed. Having worked in France, and being concerned with form, I realised that the point was the most crucial element in a formal vocabulary. These two parallel inquires, the one into nature, the other into form, merged at a point which I have called bindu.’ (S.H. Raza in conversation with Geeti Sen, ‘The World is Mine’, The Times of India, Mumbai, 14 February, 1988)

The etymology of the bindu stems from the now apocryphal story of when a young Raza’s parents, anxious about his tendency to daydream, contacted his schoolteacher, Shri Nandlalji Jharia to express their concern. In turn, his teacher asked him to stay back at school, drew a black dot on the white wall of the verandah, and asked him to focus on it in an attempt to curb his wandering mind. A black dot, which eventually comes to be known as the Bindu began appearing in his works from the 1950s in the form of a ‘Black Sun,’ as seen in Haut de Cagnes (1951). La Terre, painted in 1973 almost anticipates the impending arrival of the Bindu in the 1980s, a leitmotif which takes over the latter part of Raza’s artistic career. To Raza, the bindu represented the seed, a symbol of fertility, the cyclical nature of seasons, the circle of life and the inevitability of death. Spiritually, the bindu acted as the genesis of creation, a source of energy, and a point of meditation. The earlier works in the series drew on Eastern symbolism of colour, where the five primary colours, which he believed to emerge from black, represent the five elements: earth, water, fire, air, and space. By the mid-1990s, Raza no longer felt the urge to use colour. ‘I wanted to go beyond this, by producing paintings with only black and grey. Than with black, grey, and white. And further still, towards perfect peace, with white and pale grey.’ (Artist Statement, Raza, Paris, 2008, p.24)

The present lot symbolises Raza’s transition to a predominantly white palette, signifying his intention to pare down the bindu to its purest form. The concentric circles in monochromatic tones of white and grey vibrate outward from the central circle, making it a meditative focal point. The mind can focus on the central form and there is nothing to distract from it. ‘The inherent paradox of this image which is at once motionless, dense and opaque, and yet in movement – imbues the single form with mysterious powers.’ (Geeti Sen, Bindu: Space and Time in Raza’s Vision, Delhi, 1997, p. 131)

‘In my work as a painter, the revelation of “BINDU” as a centre of gravity has been a major event. It is the perception of life in the seed as energy condenced [sic], it is the vitality of the point in form vocabulary. Akin to music, the same image can express various moods, known + unknown, leading to the highest spiritual experience. I aspire for the pure White Bindu, the supreme icon.’ (Artist statement, S.H. Raza & Seema Ghurayya: Symphony in White, exhibition catalogue, Gallery 7, Mumbai, 2001, unpaginated)
Condition: The colours of the original are slightly subtler with softer contrast than the catalogue illustration. The painting has been recently cleaned. A few minor surface scratches visible. Overall good condition.

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Time, Location
25 Apr 2024
India, Mumbai
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[ translate ]

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF PINAKIN PATEL

Acrylic on canvas
1998
39 1/4 × 39 3/8 in. (99.8 × 100 cm.)

Signed and dated ‘RAZA ’98’ lower centre, signed, dated and inscribed ‘RAZA / 1998 / “Bindu-Peace” / 100 X 100 cm / Acrylic on Canvas’ and further titled in Devanagari on reverse

PROVENANCE:
Apparao Galleries, Chennai.

‘Now I am conceiving the bindu in white, as I had seen it recently inscribed on the forehead of a woman in India. Distilled in clarity, pure and luminous, this will be Shanti Bindu.’ (Artist Statement, ‘Bindu: The Point’, Bindu: Space and Time in Raza’s Vision, New Delhi, 1997, p. 129)

Over his seven-decade long career, Sayed Haider Raza’s primary concern began with and continued as an exploration of nature. While his work saw a series of compositional changes toward non-representational abstraction, this shift was not a rejection of his earlier practice, but a deliberate movement towards a new form of expression deeply rooted in the spiritual and creative essence of India. ‘It was a condensation of nature into its vital parts, its very essence as a ‘final supreme and universal viewing of nature, not as appearance, not as spectacle but as an integrated force of life and cosmic growth reflected in every elementary particle and in every fibre of a human being’.’ (Anne Macklin, SH Raza: Catalogue Raisonné 1972-1989 (Volume II), New Delhi, 2022, p. 9)

Raza was always interested in the spiritual implications of the ‘seed.’ He states, ‘I was a landscape painter. With time I realised that nature, in which I was interested, has its real energy in the seed. Having worked in France, and being concerned with form, I realised that the point was the most crucial element in a formal vocabulary. These two parallel inquires, the one into nature, the other into form, merged at a point which I have called bindu.’ (S.H. Raza in conversation with Geeti Sen, ‘The World is Mine’, The Times of India, Mumbai, 14 February, 1988)

The etymology of the bindu stems from the now apocryphal story of when a young Raza’s parents, anxious about his tendency to daydream, contacted his schoolteacher, Shri Nandlalji Jharia to express their concern. In turn, his teacher asked him to stay back at school, drew a black dot on the white wall of the verandah, and asked him to focus on it in an attempt to curb his wandering mind. A black dot, which eventually comes to be known as the Bindu began appearing in his works from the 1950s in the form of a ‘Black Sun,’ as seen in Haut de Cagnes (1951). La Terre, painted in 1973 almost anticipates the impending arrival of the Bindu in the 1980s, a leitmotif which takes over the latter part of Raza’s artistic career. To Raza, the bindu represented the seed, a symbol of fertility, the cyclical nature of seasons, the circle of life and the inevitability of death. Spiritually, the bindu acted as the genesis of creation, a source of energy, and a point of meditation. The earlier works in the series drew on Eastern symbolism of colour, where the five primary colours, which he believed to emerge from black, represent the five elements: earth, water, fire, air, and space. By the mid-1990s, Raza no longer felt the urge to use colour. ‘I wanted to go beyond this, by producing paintings with only black and grey. Than with black, grey, and white. And further still, towards perfect peace, with white and pale grey.’ (Artist Statement, Raza, Paris, 2008, p.24)

The present lot symbolises Raza’s transition to a predominantly white palette, signifying his intention to pare down the bindu to its purest form. The concentric circles in monochromatic tones of white and grey vibrate outward from the central circle, making it a meditative focal point. The mind can focus on the central form and there is nothing to distract from it. ‘The inherent paradox of this image which is at once motionless, dense and opaque, and yet in movement – imbues the single form with mysterious powers.’ (Geeti Sen, Bindu: Space and Time in Raza’s Vision, Delhi, 1997, p. 131)

‘In my work as a painter, the revelation of “BINDU” as a centre of gravity has been a major event. It is the perception of life in the seed as energy condenced [sic], it is the vitality of the point in form vocabulary. Akin to music, the same image can express various moods, known + unknown, leading to the highest spiritual experience. I aspire for the pure White Bindu, the supreme icon.’ (Artist statement, S.H. Raza & Seema Ghurayya: Symphony in White, exhibition catalogue, Gallery 7, Mumbai, 2001, unpaginated)
Condition: The colours of the original are slightly subtler with softer contrast than the catalogue illustration. The painting has been recently cleaned. A few minor surface scratches visible. Overall good condition.

[ translate ]
Sale price
Unlock
Estimate
Unlock
Reserve
Unlock
Time, Location
25 Apr 2024
India, Mumbai
Auction House
Unlock