Search Price Results
Wish

LOT 83

Pyke Koch (1901-1991), Still life with pears and lemons

[ translate ]

Pyke Koch (1901-1991)

Still life with pears and lemons

signed and dated 'P. Koch 45' (lower right)

oil on canvas, 23,5x35 cm

Exhibited:-Rotterdam, Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, 'Pyke Koch. Schilderijen en Tekeningen', 26 February-14 May 1995, no. 49.-Lausanne, Musée cantonal des Beaux-Arts, 'Pyke Koch. Réalisme magique aux Pays-Bas', 18 June-27 August 1995, no. 24.-Paris, Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, ‘Charley Toorop’, 19 February-9 May 2010, no. 94.Literature:-Talitha Schoon, Carel Blotkamp, Dory Kicken and Karel Schampers, ‘Pyke Koch, schilderijen en tekeningen', Rotterdam 1995, ill. p. 63, no. 49.-Jörg F. Zutter, Bram Kempers and John Steen, ‘Pyke Koch, réalisme magique aux Pays-Bas’, Lausanne 1995, ill. no. 24.-Marja Bosma, Carel Blotkamp and Catherine Gonnard, ‘Charley Toorop’, Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris 2010, ill. 222, no. 94.Provenance:-Acquired directly from the artist by Jacob Mees (1885-1970), thence by descent to the present owner.-Collection Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam, 2007-2024 (on loan).

This work will be included in the Catalogue Raisonné of Pyke Koch-paintings in the forthcoming monograph, currently being prepared by Mieke Rijnders (Waanders Uitgevers, Zwolle). The still life is one of the cornerstones of the Western art world. The genre grew from an exercise for new artists to a way for established artists to showcase their talents. As an artist, Pyke Koch would exclusively create figure paintings, but he too would make an exception for a small collection of still lifes.Pyke Koch was a self-taught painter, born in the Netherlands. He chose to study Law but would quit just before his final exam. Instead, he found the painting supplies gifted to him by his sister years earlier and would create his first artworks. While some sources claim his interest in art was born when he met artist Charley Toorop, others say his art career started when he convinced a woman in a café to pose for him by claiming to be an artist. When asked about the situation, Koch’s only answer was “I had just ended an engagement and met another woman, older than me, a mature woman. She was fantastic in a variety of ways. That is when I started painting.”Koch had no official art education: he learned from books, talked with befriended artists, and followed several courses at the Utrechtse Kunsthistorisch Instituut to learn more about painting materials and chemistry. His self-study focused on the Italian Renaissance, and he emulated the realistic look and highly detailed execution of this era in his own work.Alongside the amazing level of detail in his work, he was known for his style: magic realism. This art style was a rebellion against the abstract movement and is characterised by its life-like execution, its mysterious atmosphere and an eerie dissonance between the various real-world elements depicted in the work. The viewer can feel that something is not right, although they cannot always discern what seems to be off about the painting.In this composition, each bump, dimple and spot in the fruit has been lovingly painted in such a realistic manner that it seems easy to reach out and grab a juicy pear from the wooden table. Koch is said to have been inspired by early the Flemish Primitives and Italian Renaissance artists such as Pierro della Francesca and Andrea Mantegna. In this work he combined the attention for detail of these fifteenth century artists with the Chiaroscuro technique. A singular excessive light source in the foreground illuminates the still life, contrasting with the dark, looming background. The obscure Italianate landscape also refers to the Italian Renaissance masters that Koch was so inspired by.As the results of his talents show, Koch had a desire for perfection. Since he destroyed every artwork he deemed flawed, his oeuvre shrunk to around one hundred paintings, about ten of which were still lifes. Many of these still lifes were painted on small canvases and were created just after the war. Plagued by heavy allegations of wartime collaboration, many of these works were used to trade for food, coffee, or tobacco. However, the painting in this auction would have a different fate: it was immediately acquired by Jacob Mees, an insurance broker, banker, and known patron of Koch. The awe-inspiring painting would stay in the family for the remainder of the century and will be on the market for the very first time in our upcoming auction.

[ translate ]
Sale price
Unlock
Estimate
Unlock
Time, Location
28 May 2024
Netherlands, Hague
Auction House
Unlock

[ translate ]

Pyke Koch (1901-1991)

Still life with pears and lemons

signed and dated 'P. Koch 45' (lower right)

oil on canvas, 23,5x35 cm

Exhibited:-Rotterdam, Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, 'Pyke Koch. Schilderijen en Tekeningen', 26 February-14 May 1995, no. 49.-Lausanne, Musée cantonal des Beaux-Arts, 'Pyke Koch. Réalisme magique aux Pays-Bas', 18 June-27 August 1995, no. 24.-Paris, Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, ‘Charley Toorop’, 19 February-9 May 2010, no. 94.Literature:-Talitha Schoon, Carel Blotkamp, Dory Kicken and Karel Schampers, ‘Pyke Koch, schilderijen en tekeningen', Rotterdam 1995, ill. p. 63, no. 49.-Jörg F. Zutter, Bram Kempers and John Steen, ‘Pyke Koch, réalisme magique aux Pays-Bas’, Lausanne 1995, ill. no. 24.-Marja Bosma, Carel Blotkamp and Catherine Gonnard, ‘Charley Toorop’, Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris 2010, ill. 222, no. 94.Provenance:-Acquired directly from the artist by Jacob Mees (1885-1970), thence by descent to the present owner.-Collection Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam, 2007-2024 (on loan).

This work will be included in the Catalogue Raisonné of Pyke Koch-paintings in the forthcoming monograph, currently being prepared by Mieke Rijnders (Waanders Uitgevers, Zwolle). The still life is one of the cornerstones of the Western art world. The genre grew from an exercise for new artists to a way for established artists to showcase their talents. As an artist, Pyke Koch would exclusively create figure paintings, but he too would make an exception for a small collection of still lifes.Pyke Koch was a self-taught painter, born in the Netherlands. He chose to study Law but would quit just before his final exam. Instead, he found the painting supplies gifted to him by his sister years earlier and would create his first artworks. While some sources claim his interest in art was born when he met artist Charley Toorop, others say his art career started when he convinced a woman in a café to pose for him by claiming to be an artist. When asked about the situation, Koch’s only answer was “I had just ended an engagement and met another woman, older than me, a mature woman. She was fantastic in a variety of ways. That is when I started painting.”Koch had no official art education: he learned from books, talked with befriended artists, and followed several courses at the Utrechtse Kunsthistorisch Instituut to learn more about painting materials and chemistry. His self-study focused on the Italian Renaissance, and he emulated the realistic look and highly detailed execution of this era in his own work.Alongside the amazing level of detail in his work, he was known for his style: magic realism. This art style was a rebellion against the abstract movement and is characterised by its life-like execution, its mysterious atmosphere and an eerie dissonance between the various real-world elements depicted in the work. The viewer can feel that something is not right, although they cannot always discern what seems to be off about the painting.In this composition, each bump, dimple and spot in the fruit has been lovingly painted in such a realistic manner that it seems easy to reach out and grab a juicy pear from the wooden table. Koch is said to have been inspired by early the Flemish Primitives and Italian Renaissance artists such as Pierro della Francesca and Andrea Mantegna. In this work he combined the attention for detail of these fifteenth century artists with the Chiaroscuro technique. A singular excessive light source in the foreground illuminates the still life, contrasting with the dark, looming background. The obscure Italianate landscape also refers to the Italian Renaissance masters that Koch was so inspired by.As the results of his talents show, Koch had a desire for perfection. Since he destroyed every artwork he deemed flawed, his oeuvre shrunk to around one hundred paintings, about ten of which were still lifes. Many of these still lifes were painted on small canvases and were created just after the war. Plagued by heavy allegations of wartime collaboration, many of these works were used to trade for food, coffee, or tobacco. However, the painting in this auction would have a different fate: it was immediately acquired by Jacob Mees, an insurance broker, banker, and known patron of Koch. The awe-inspiring painting would stay in the family for the remainder of the century and will be on the market for the very first time in our upcoming auction.

[ translate ]
Sale price
Unlock
Estimate
Unlock
Time, Location
28 May 2024
Netherlands, Hague
Auction House
Unlock