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Théodore Géricault (1791–1824) - English officers

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Very beautiful work on paper, around 1800, representing English officers.
Dimensions: 19. 5 x 11. 5 cm at sight (framed 60x47cm) .
Origin:
Private collection Paris
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Certificate from Wildestein Institute dated April 15, 2022 (see photo) :
The work will be included in the catalog raisonné supplement.
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A fiery and tormented personality, Théodore Géricault (1791–1824) is, with Eugène Delacroix, the incarnation of the French romantic painter. He is also the author of one of the most famous works of the 19th century: The Raft of the Medusa, which revolutionized history painting under the Restoration. The painter, fascinated by morbid themes, was also a great lover of horses, which he represented in numerous works.
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You can share an article by clicking on the share icons present on it. The total or partial reproduction of an article published on Beaux. Arts. com, without the prior written authorization of Beaux Arts & Cie, is strictly prohibited. For more information, see our legal notices.
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Born in Rouen into a wealthy family, Théodore Géricault nevertheless spent his youth in Paris, where his family moved when he was five years old. Passionate about horses since his earliest childhood, Géricault also discovered the world of drawing at a very young age. . His first self-portrait dates from 1808, when he was only 17 years old. He was then encouraged by his uncle to embark on a career as an artist. In 1810 he entered the studio of Carle Vernet, then that of the neoclassical painter Pierre-Narcisse Guérin. He became friends with Eugène Delacroix, with whom he joined the School of Fine Arts a few years apart. Géricault wanders the galleries of the Louvre museum, where he studies and copies the great masters. In 1812, the young painter sent his first painting to the Salon. This is an ambitious military portrait participating in Napoleonic propaganda, Officer of the Imperial Guard charging. He received the gold medal, a feat for such a young painter, and moved into a studio. But two years later, he sent to the exhibition a much less heroic painting representing a wounded Cuirassier leaving the fire. He excelled in equestrian painting. In the grip of an unhappy and scandalous love affair with his aunt, Géricault joined the royal guard of Louis XVIII, during the First Monarchical Restoration that the country was experiencing. He accompanied the king to Ghent during Napoleon's short-lived return. After failing in the competition for the Prix de Rome, Géricault still left for Italy in 1816. Michelangelo and his mannerist accents fascinated him. In 1816, he embarked on an ambitious and spectacular historical composition, inspired by a widely publicized news item: the abandonment by the government of Louis XVIII of a frigate which had failed off the Senegalese coast. It was the birth of The Raft of the Medusa, a polemical canvas in the form of a political allegory, which ensured Géricault great notoriety at the Salon of 1819 (where it was exhibited under the title A Shipwreck) . To compose the cadaverous bodies, Géricault works from corpses borrowed from the morgue. After a stay in England, Géricault returns to France, ill. At Salpêtrière, he painted portraits of mentally ill people (monomaniacs) , a subject previously unpublished. In a worrying state himself, he fell from a horse in 1823 and died a few months later, after a long and painful agony. His body rests in the Père-Lachaise cemetery.
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His key works:
Wounded Cuirassier leaving the fire, 1814
The Raft of the Medusa, 1818–1819
Monomane, 1819–1821
The Epsom Derby, 1821
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#Table. Q1
#roomsavantgarde

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03 Mar 2024
France
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[ translate ]

Very beautiful work on paper, around 1800, representing English officers.
Dimensions: 19. 5 x 11. 5 cm at sight (framed 60x47cm) .
Origin:
Private collection Paris
\r
Certificate from Wildestein Institute dated April 15, 2022 (see photo) :
The work will be included in the catalog raisonné supplement.
\r
A fiery and tormented personality, Théodore Géricault (1791–1824) is, with Eugène Delacroix, the incarnation of the French romantic painter. He is also the author of one of the most famous works of the 19th century: The Raft of the Medusa, which revolutionized history painting under the Restoration. The painter, fascinated by morbid themes, was also a great lover of horses, which he represented in numerous works.
\r
You can share an article by clicking on the share icons present on it. The total or partial reproduction of an article published on Beaux. Arts. com, without the prior written authorization of Beaux Arts & Cie, is strictly prohibited. For more information, see our legal notices.
\r
Born in Rouen into a wealthy family, Théodore Géricault nevertheless spent his youth in Paris, where his family moved when he was five years old. Passionate about horses since his earliest childhood, Géricault also discovered the world of drawing at a very young age. . His first self-portrait dates from 1808, when he was only 17 years old. He was then encouraged by his uncle to embark on a career as an artist. In 1810 he entered the studio of Carle Vernet, then that of the neoclassical painter Pierre-Narcisse Guérin. He became friends with Eugène Delacroix, with whom he joined the School of Fine Arts a few years apart. Géricault wanders the galleries of the Louvre museum, where he studies and copies the great masters. In 1812, the young painter sent his first painting to the Salon. This is an ambitious military portrait participating in Napoleonic propaganda, Officer of the Imperial Guard charging. He received the gold medal, a feat for such a young painter, and moved into a studio. But two years later, he sent to the exhibition a much less heroic painting representing a wounded Cuirassier leaving the fire. He excelled in equestrian painting. In the grip of an unhappy and scandalous love affair with his aunt, Géricault joined the royal guard of Louis XVIII, during the First Monarchical Restoration that the country was experiencing. He accompanied the king to Ghent during Napoleon's short-lived return. After failing in the competition for the Prix de Rome, Géricault still left for Italy in 1816. Michelangelo and his mannerist accents fascinated him. In 1816, he embarked on an ambitious and spectacular historical composition, inspired by a widely publicized news item: the abandonment by the government of Louis XVIII of a frigate which had failed off the Senegalese coast. It was the birth of The Raft of the Medusa, a polemical canvas in the form of a political allegory, which ensured Géricault great notoriety at the Salon of 1819 (where it was exhibited under the title A Shipwreck) . To compose the cadaverous bodies, Géricault works from corpses borrowed from the morgue. After a stay in England, Géricault returns to France, ill. At Salpêtrière, he painted portraits of mentally ill people (monomaniacs) , a subject previously unpublished. In a worrying state himself, he fell from a horse in 1823 and died a few months later, after a long and painful agony. His body rests in the Père-Lachaise cemetery.
\r
His key works:
Wounded Cuirassier leaving the fire, 1814
The Raft of the Medusa, 1818–1819
Monomane, 1819–1821
The Epsom Derby, 1821
\r
#Table. Q1
#roomsavantgarde

[ translate ]
Estimate
Unlock
Time, Location
03 Mar 2024
France
Auction House
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