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PROPERTY FROM THE ARTIST’S FAMILY

Gouache on paper
1945-1946
10 1/4 × 11 3/8 in. (26 × 28.9 cm.)

Signed and dated ‘K. K. Hebbar / 1945’ upper right and further signed and dated ‘Hebbar / 46’ lower left

Kattingeri Krishna Hebbar’s ‘early works show the active life spirit hidden within the rustic village folk and the ordinary people of his surroundings.’ (Hebbar An Artist’s Quest, exhibition catalogue, National Gallery of Modern Art, Bengaluru, 2011, p. 31) In the early 1950s, Hebbar desired to part with the academic style he was lauded for in the previous decade, and, inspired by Ananda Coomaraswamy’s writings on Indian art, he decided to experiment with gouache and tempera. As the artist felt that he had already worked with oil paint, he decided to change mediums, and chose to work in smaller formats, seeking inspiration from Indian manuscript, miniature, and mural painting traditions. At the same time, he shifted his focus to everyday rural subjects, rather than deified and elite ones.

The earliest work in the current sale is dated to 1945-1946, and is a charming rural scene of women engaged in their daily activities. Hebbar has chosen to depict a multi- generational group of women engrossed in their daily chat, distinguishable through their different sari styles – the matriarch wears the traditional nine-yard sari, while the two younger women are in a more modern flowing drape, and the young girl in a printed skirt. This vignette of everyday life exhibits an early preoccupation with people and lives at the grassroots. Even at this formative stage of his career, Hebbar’s use of line, be it the outline of the cows’ bodies or the fullness of the women’s figures, already stands out for its lyrical expressiveness.
Condition: The paper tones of the original are similar to the catalogue illustration. Minor abrasions visible in the lower left corner, as visible in the catalogue illustration. Minor spots of pigment loss visible on the dupatta of the figure to the left and below the cow’s neck. Minor creasing visible to the lower right corner of the work with associated spots of pigment loss, visible in the catalogue illustration. Not examined out of frame. Overall good condition.

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25 Apr 2024
India, Mumbai
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[ translate ]

PROPERTY FROM THE ARTIST’S FAMILY

Gouache on paper
1945-1946
10 1/4 × 11 3/8 in. (26 × 28.9 cm.)

Signed and dated ‘K. K. Hebbar / 1945’ upper right and further signed and dated ‘Hebbar / 46’ lower left

Kattingeri Krishna Hebbar’s ‘early works show the active life spirit hidden within the rustic village folk and the ordinary people of his surroundings.’ (Hebbar An Artist’s Quest, exhibition catalogue, National Gallery of Modern Art, Bengaluru, 2011, p. 31) In the early 1950s, Hebbar desired to part with the academic style he was lauded for in the previous decade, and, inspired by Ananda Coomaraswamy’s writings on Indian art, he decided to experiment with gouache and tempera. As the artist felt that he had already worked with oil paint, he decided to change mediums, and chose to work in smaller formats, seeking inspiration from Indian manuscript, miniature, and mural painting traditions. At the same time, he shifted his focus to everyday rural subjects, rather than deified and elite ones.

The earliest work in the current sale is dated to 1945-1946, and is a charming rural scene of women engaged in their daily activities. Hebbar has chosen to depict a multi- generational group of women engrossed in their daily chat, distinguishable through their different sari styles – the matriarch wears the traditional nine-yard sari, while the two younger women are in a more modern flowing drape, and the young girl in a printed skirt. This vignette of everyday life exhibits an early preoccupation with people and lives at the grassroots. Even at this formative stage of his career, Hebbar’s use of line, be it the outline of the cows’ bodies or the fullness of the women’s figures, already stands out for its lyrical expressiveness.
Condition: The paper tones of the original are similar to the catalogue illustration. Minor abrasions visible in the lower left corner, as visible in the catalogue illustration. Minor spots of pigment loss visible on the dupatta of the figure to the left and below the cow’s neck. Minor creasing visible to the lower right corner of the work with associated spots of pigment loss, visible in the catalogue illustration. Not examined out of frame. Overall good condition.

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Sale price
Unlock
Estimate
Unlock
Reserve
Unlock
Time, Location
25 Apr 2024
India, Mumbai
Auction House
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