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The Haldensleben Cartulary A Cartulary, in Latin and German, manuscript...

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The Haldensleben Cartulary
A Cartulary, in Latin and German, manuscript on vellum [Germany, probably Haldensleben, late 15th century]
Complete and in its unrestored contemporary blind-stamped binding; from a convent of Cistercian nuns.

300 × 200mm. i + 102 leaves, complete, pp.4, 38–9, 73–75, 86–89, 105–107, and 187 ruled, otherwise blank; collation: 1–410, 56 (of 8, v & vi cancelled), 6–98, 1010, 118, 122, partially foliated in medieval lower-case roman numerals on versos, apparently before the blank leaves in gathering 5 were cancelled, paginated more systematically in a 17th(?)-century hand [i–iii], 1–219, 230–[237] (i.e. omitting 220–229 in error), the blank leaves in gathering 5 by then having been cancelled; prickings survive at the fore-edge throughout; ruled in leadpoint, usually for 28 lines of text per page (14 in the first two gatherings), 215 × 130mm, written mostly in an informal gothic bookhand, with additions in cursive script, capitals stroked in red, headings underlined in red, paraphs in red (the vellum rather thick, of average quality, with natural flaws and signs of use, but generally in good condition).

Binding:
Sewn on four double cords and bound in contemporary blind-stamped leather over oak boards, with the original(?) clasp-fittings, the lower cover rather worn, but most of the stamps on the upper cover still clear and crisp; the spine with a paper label inscribed ‘Registrum / Monasterii / Haldens[...] / M[...]’, the next compartment inscribed in capitals ‘Copiale / M. V. Haldesleb(?) / ao(?) / 1490’ (the top and bottom of the spine partly defective, but overall in sound, well preserved, and unrestored condition)

Provenance:
(1) Made for, and doubtless at, the Cistercian nunnery of Haldensleben (Kloster Althaldensleben), about 13 miles / 20 km north-west of Magdeburg, founded in 1228 by Archbishop Albrecht II of Magdeburg, and secularised in 1810.

(2) Sotheby’s, 19 June 2001, lot 33 (with full-page and smaller colour reproductions), bought by Quaritch on behalf of:

(3) The Schøyen Collection, MS 4601.

Content:
Title-page, by the original scribe: ‘Registrum prepositure Monasteriii et tocius Conventus in Hadenslene de annuis Censibus Pactis & redditibus Pratis & Lignis et aliis eorum proprietatibus’, p.[iii]; list of gifts, with the names of the donors, headed ‘Antiqua Haldenslone’, pp.1–3; list of gifts headed ‘In nova Haldenslone’, pp.5–8; lists of covenant, pp.9–35, in various places including Wederinghe (Wedringen), Glusingh (Glüsig), Valdorpp (Valdorf), Ko(c)khoner, Ackendorpp (Ackendorf), Hundesborch, Magna Rothmerslone, Magna Santerslone, Meytzendorpp, Magna Aminenslone(?), Dalwerslone, Dreynlone, Parva and Magna Rodenslone, Ochmerslone, Ekenbardelene, Schakenslone, Herinstorpp, Eylslone, Zehnsen, Domerslone, Parva Germerslone, Parva Wantzlene, Magna Wulzhusen, Alnenslone, Hultze, Gadwelle, Magdeborch (Magdeburg), and others; followed by an added note dated 1687, pp.36–37.

(pp.40–200) Copies of about 150 documents detailing the properties and privileges of the nunnery, from the foundation charter onwards: ‘Incipit registracio copiarum & privilegiorum seu litterarum monasterii veteris Haldensloue cum titulis bonorum In eis confirmatorum […]’; the first document is dated 13 November 1228 and begins: ‘In nomine sancte & individue Trinitatis Albertus dei gracia Sancte Magdeburgensis ecclesie archiepiscopus legatus et comes romaniole [i.e. Albrecht von Kevernburg, archbishop 1205-32] karissimis in Christo filiabus abatisse priorisse ceterisque sororibus apud Haldeslene […]’, witnessed by ‘Willebrandus mayor praepositus, Fredericus decanus, Wernerus de Himoldesborch praepositus’ and many others; the second document is the confirmation of the foundation, dated 6 November 1236: ‘In nomine sancte & individue Trinitatis Wilbrandus dei gratia Sancte Magdeburgensis ecclesie archiepiscopus [1235–54] […]’; most documents are in Latin, but some (nos. 13, 14, 18, 34, 39, 45, etc.) are in German: ‘We Rudolff van Woldinghestorpp und Mechtolt Frederickes Huskuwe van Hornhusen Rudolfs suster rekennen […] Mº cccxxv in sinte Gregorius daghe’, etc.; some documents are in post-medieval hands, copied onto pages previously left blank for such additions.

(pp. 201–202) List of monies paid to Ernst, archbishop of Magdeburg (1476–1513).

(pp. 203–209) Texts added by 16th- to 18th-century and later hands, in Latin and German, ending with one signed by the notary Johann Heinrich Gutjahr, dated 1729, with his ink-stamp and red wax seal; pp. 210–237 ruled, otherwise blank, except for pp. 212 and 236.

Cartularies are registers of title-deeds, privileges, and other documents which are kept by landowners as evidence of their rights, and the obligations of their tenants, compiled primarily for purposes of reference so that they can enforce their rights and produce relevant documents in legal cases. Preserving copies of documents spanning centuries, they are an unrivalled source of information about the personnel and economics of the institution to which they relate; in this case a little-studied convent of Cistercian nuns. The great bibliophile Sir Thomas Phillipps considered the cartularies the most important texts in his library.

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Time, Location
11 Jun 2024
UK, London
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[ translate ]

The Haldensleben Cartulary
A Cartulary, in Latin and German, manuscript on vellum [Germany, probably Haldensleben, late 15th century]
Complete and in its unrestored contemporary blind-stamped binding; from a convent of Cistercian nuns.

300 × 200mm. i + 102 leaves, complete, pp.4, 38–9, 73–75, 86–89, 105–107, and 187 ruled, otherwise blank; collation: 1–410, 56 (of 8, v & vi cancelled), 6–98, 1010, 118, 122, partially foliated in medieval lower-case roman numerals on versos, apparently before the blank leaves in gathering 5 were cancelled, paginated more systematically in a 17th(?)-century hand [i–iii], 1–219, 230–[237] (i.e. omitting 220–229 in error), the blank leaves in gathering 5 by then having been cancelled; prickings survive at the fore-edge throughout; ruled in leadpoint, usually for 28 lines of text per page (14 in the first two gatherings), 215 × 130mm, written mostly in an informal gothic bookhand, with additions in cursive script, capitals stroked in red, headings underlined in red, paraphs in red (the vellum rather thick, of average quality, with natural flaws and signs of use, but generally in good condition).

Binding:
Sewn on four double cords and bound in contemporary blind-stamped leather over oak boards, with the original(?) clasp-fittings, the lower cover rather worn, but most of the stamps on the upper cover still clear and crisp; the spine with a paper label inscribed ‘Registrum / Monasterii / Haldens[...] / M[...]’, the next compartment inscribed in capitals ‘Copiale / M. V. Haldesleb(?) / ao(?) / 1490’ (the top and bottom of the spine partly defective, but overall in sound, well preserved, and unrestored condition)

Provenance:
(1) Made for, and doubtless at, the Cistercian nunnery of Haldensleben (Kloster Althaldensleben), about 13 miles / 20 km north-west of Magdeburg, founded in 1228 by Archbishop Albrecht II of Magdeburg, and secularised in 1810.

(2) Sotheby’s, 19 June 2001, lot 33 (with full-page and smaller colour reproductions), bought by Quaritch on behalf of:

(3) The Schøyen Collection, MS 4601.

Content:
Title-page, by the original scribe: ‘Registrum prepositure Monasteriii et tocius Conventus in Hadenslene de annuis Censibus Pactis & redditibus Pratis & Lignis et aliis eorum proprietatibus’, p.[iii]; list of gifts, with the names of the donors, headed ‘Antiqua Haldenslone’, pp.1–3; list of gifts headed ‘In nova Haldenslone’, pp.5–8; lists of covenant, pp.9–35, in various places including Wederinghe (Wedringen), Glusingh (Glüsig), Valdorpp (Valdorf), Ko(c)khoner, Ackendorpp (Ackendorf), Hundesborch, Magna Rothmerslone, Magna Santerslone, Meytzendorpp, Magna Aminenslone(?), Dalwerslone, Dreynlone, Parva and Magna Rodenslone, Ochmerslone, Ekenbardelene, Schakenslone, Herinstorpp, Eylslone, Zehnsen, Domerslone, Parva Germerslone, Parva Wantzlene, Magna Wulzhusen, Alnenslone, Hultze, Gadwelle, Magdeborch (Magdeburg), and others; followed by an added note dated 1687, pp.36–37.

(pp.40–200) Copies of about 150 documents detailing the properties and privileges of the nunnery, from the foundation charter onwards: ‘Incipit registracio copiarum & privilegiorum seu litterarum monasterii veteris Haldensloue cum titulis bonorum In eis confirmatorum […]’; the first document is dated 13 November 1228 and begins: ‘In nomine sancte & individue Trinitatis Albertus dei gracia Sancte Magdeburgensis ecclesie archiepiscopus legatus et comes romaniole [i.e. Albrecht von Kevernburg, archbishop 1205-32] karissimis in Christo filiabus abatisse priorisse ceterisque sororibus apud Haldeslene […]’, witnessed by ‘Willebrandus mayor praepositus, Fredericus decanus, Wernerus de Himoldesborch praepositus’ and many others; the second document is the confirmation of the foundation, dated 6 November 1236: ‘In nomine sancte & individue Trinitatis Wilbrandus dei gratia Sancte Magdeburgensis ecclesie archiepiscopus [1235–54] […]’; most documents are in Latin, but some (nos. 13, 14, 18, 34, 39, 45, etc.) are in German: ‘We Rudolff van Woldinghestorpp und Mechtolt Frederickes Huskuwe van Hornhusen Rudolfs suster rekennen […] Mº cccxxv in sinte Gregorius daghe’, etc.; some documents are in post-medieval hands, copied onto pages previously left blank for such additions.

(pp. 201–202) List of monies paid to Ernst, archbishop of Magdeburg (1476–1513).

(pp. 203–209) Texts added by 16th- to 18th-century and later hands, in Latin and German, ending with one signed by the notary Johann Heinrich Gutjahr, dated 1729, with his ink-stamp and red wax seal; pp. 210–237 ruled, otherwise blank, except for pp. 212 and 236.

Cartularies are registers of title-deeds, privileges, and other documents which are kept by landowners as evidence of their rights, and the obligations of their tenants, compiled primarily for purposes of reference so that they can enforce their rights and produce relevant documents in legal cases. Preserving copies of documents spanning centuries, they are an unrivalled source of information about the personnel and economics of the institution to which they relate; in this case a little-studied convent of Cistercian nuns. The great bibliophile Sir Thomas Phillipps considered the cartularies the most important texts in his library.

[ translate ]
Sale price
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Estimate
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Time, Location
11 Jun 2024
UK, London
Auction House
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