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The sole example built, one of one 1985 Ferrari Testarossa...

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1985 Ferrari Testarossa Targa by EBS
VIN. ZFFTA17B000055885
Engine no. 00106

4,942cc DOHC Flat 12-Cylinder Engine
Bosch K-Jetronic Fuel Injection
380bhp at 6,300rpm
5-Speed Manual Transaxle
4-Wheel Independent Suspension
4-Wheel Disc Brakes

*Converted from new to Targa specification by EBS in 1985
*Rare and desirable 'Monospecchio, Monodado' example
*Striking original color of Giallo Ferrari 102
*Described when new as the most expensive new open car available
*Recent eight-page magazine feature article in the Ferrari Owners Club (UK) magazine
*Recently treated to an extensive engine rebuild, invoices on file for circa $100,000

THE FERRARI TESTAROSSA

Ferrari's flagship model, the Testarossa supercar revived a famous name from the Italian company's past when it arrived in 1984. A 'next generation' 512 Berlinetta Boxer, the Testarossa retained its predecessor's amidships-mounted, 5.0-liter, flat-12 engine. Reflecting Ferrari's racing heritage, the latter had first appeared in 4.4-liter form in the 365 GT4 BB having been developed using experience gained from the Maranello firm's World Championship-winning, flat-12 Formula 1 and sports-racing units. As deployed in the Testarossa, this unique engine now boasted a maximum power output raised to 380bhp at 6,300rpm courtesy of four-valve cylinder heads. Despite the power increase, smoothness and driveability were enhanced, the car possessing excellent top gear flexibility allied to a maximum speed of 290km/h (180mph).

Rivalling Lamborghini's Countach for presence the Pininfarina-styled Testarossa succeeded brilliantly, the gill slats feeding air to its side-mounted radiators being one of the modern era's most instantly recognizable – and copied - styling devices. A larger car than the 512 BB - the increase in width being necessary to accommodate wider tires - the Testarossa managed the trick of combining high downforce with a low coefficient of drag, its graceful body being notable for the absence of extraneous spoilers and other such devices. Early cars featured a controversial high single mirror (monospecchio), which gave good rearwards visibility and these early cars have become some of the most desirable of Testarossas.

Despite the increase in size over the 512 BB, the Testarossa was lighter than its predecessor, the body - its steel doors and roof excepted - being, somewhat unusually for a production Ferrari, of aluminum. Luxury touches in the well-equipped cabin included air conditioning, electrically adjustable seats, tilting steering wheel and plentiful leather. Unlike some of its rivals, the Testarossa possessed light controls and was relatively easy to drive, factors which, allied to its outstanding performance and stunning looks, contributed to an instant and sustained high level of demand.

THE CAR OFFERED

Unlike with its contemporary V8 series, Ferrari did not offer an open-top convertible or Targa version of the Testarossa, although they did build one Spider version for FIAT boss, Giovanni Agnelli. This left the field open to various specialist companies such as the Belgian firm EBS (well known for their officially sanctioned Renault 5 cabriolets) who were responsible for the unique car offered here.

This car was converted when new by Ernst Berg of EBS for a wealthy American customer (described in an Italian period magazine publication as a "Dallas oilman"). EBS usually created fully open cars but in this instance opted for a more conservative approach that retained the rear buttresses. A 60cm section was cut from the roof and then refashioned as two independently removable panels, in order to be easily stowed in the front boot, and even allowing the car to be used with only one panel out if desired. To compensate for the absent roof, carefully designed bracing was added to the passenger compartment to maintain rigidity. "Our car is just as stiff as the coupe" was the claim by Ernst Berg in Sport Auto, and a copy of a period drawing on file shows the structure of this bracing, a properly engineered undertaking adding only 50kg to the cars weight. It is reported to drive very well. The removeable roof panels were first finished in body colored Giallo before it was realized they would be better protected from scratches and light damage when removed by covering in a similar material to that used on the contemporary 328 GTS.

Factory-built to European specification in 1985 (there was no US version at the time), and ordered via the Belgian Garage Francorchamps dealership, this car is one of the rare and desirable Monospecchio examples with the single wing mirror and Monodado center-lock wheels, finished in Giallo. It is understood that the car was modified to meet local requirements when it arrived in the USA, hence the side repeaters. First registered on Belgian plates as 'DTF.425', it featured in several motoring magazines immediately after conversion and in November 1985 appeared on the front cover of Sport Auto. In Sport Auto it was noted that this car (at 270,000 Marks) was the most expensive open car in the world at the time.

The accompanying Carfax notes that the car was in Washington in 1991, with further inspections there in 1997, 1999 and 2005. A change of owner is noted in 2001. In 2006 the Ferrari was offered for sale online and the Carfax notes that in early 2008 the car made its way to Hawaii, where it stayed until late 2012 when it was offered again for sale in California where it was purchased by the current owner, a UK-based Ferrari Owners' Club member, shipped to the UK, and registered as 'B183 FNO'. He kept the Testarossa for a few years before selling it to a doctor, who subsequently went to work in Australia having commissioned major works to the car, only to get stuck abroad due to Covid travel restrictions. The current vendor repurchased the car from him in 2020 and completed the work, which was undertaken by Grimaldi Engineering. This included an extensive engine rebuild; an interior replacement in black leather; and fitting new wheels to take modern tires (the original faded cream interior and original wheels are included in the sale). The total invoices on file for this amount to more than £82,000 (circa $100,000). The current odometer reading is a circa 55,600km (34,500 miles), meaning it has covered less than 200 miles since the engine rebuild. The body and paintwork are understood to remain largely original.

A wonderful opportunity to own and enjoy a unique open Ferrari, epitomizing the excess of the 1980s, guaranteed to turn heads at any gathering of 'Prancing Horse' enthusiasts, featured in several magazines and noted as the most expensive open top car in the world when new.

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1985 Ferrari Testarossa Targa by EBS
VIN. ZFFTA17B000055885
Engine no. 00106

4,942cc DOHC Flat 12-Cylinder Engine
Bosch K-Jetronic Fuel Injection
380bhp at 6,300rpm
5-Speed Manual Transaxle
4-Wheel Independent Suspension
4-Wheel Disc Brakes

*Converted from new to Targa specification by EBS in 1985
*Rare and desirable 'Monospecchio, Monodado' example
*Striking original color of Giallo Ferrari 102
*Described when new as the most expensive new open car available
*Recent eight-page magazine feature article in the Ferrari Owners Club (UK) magazine
*Recently treated to an extensive engine rebuild, invoices on file for circa $100,000

THE FERRARI TESTAROSSA

Ferrari's flagship model, the Testarossa supercar revived a famous name from the Italian company's past when it arrived in 1984. A 'next generation' 512 Berlinetta Boxer, the Testarossa retained its predecessor's amidships-mounted, 5.0-liter, flat-12 engine. Reflecting Ferrari's racing heritage, the latter had first appeared in 4.4-liter form in the 365 GT4 BB having been developed using experience gained from the Maranello firm's World Championship-winning, flat-12 Formula 1 and sports-racing units. As deployed in the Testarossa, this unique engine now boasted a maximum power output raised to 380bhp at 6,300rpm courtesy of four-valve cylinder heads. Despite the power increase, smoothness and driveability were enhanced, the car possessing excellent top gear flexibility allied to a maximum speed of 290km/h (180mph).

Rivalling Lamborghini's Countach for presence the Pininfarina-styled Testarossa succeeded brilliantly, the gill slats feeding air to its side-mounted radiators being one of the modern era's most instantly recognizable – and copied - styling devices. A larger car than the 512 BB - the increase in width being necessary to accommodate wider tires - the Testarossa managed the trick of combining high downforce with a low coefficient of drag, its graceful body being notable for the absence of extraneous spoilers and other such devices. Early cars featured a controversial high single mirror (monospecchio), which gave good rearwards visibility and these early cars have become some of the most desirable of Testarossas.

Despite the increase in size over the 512 BB, the Testarossa was lighter than its predecessor, the body - its steel doors and roof excepted - being, somewhat unusually for a production Ferrari, of aluminum. Luxury touches in the well-equipped cabin included air conditioning, electrically adjustable seats, tilting steering wheel and plentiful leather. Unlike some of its rivals, the Testarossa possessed light controls and was relatively easy to drive, factors which, allied to its outstanding performance and stunning looks, contributed to an instant and sustained high level of demand.

THE CAR OFFERED

Unlike with its contemporary V8 series, Ferrari did not offer an open-top convertible or Targa version of the Testarossa, although they did build one Spider version for FIAT boss, Giovanni Agnelli. This left the field open to various specialist companies such as the Belgian firm EBS (well known for their officially sanctioned Renault 5 cabriolets) who were responsible for the unique car offered here.

This car was converted when new by Ernst Berg of EBS for a wealthy American customer (described in an Italian period magazine publication as a "Dallas oilman"). EBS usually created fully open cars but in this instance opted for a more conservative approach that retained the rear buttresses. A 60cm section was cut from the roof and then refashioned as two independently removable panels, in order to be easily stowed in the front boot, and even allowing the car to be used with only one panel out if desired. To compensate for the absent roof, carefully designed bracing was added to the passenger compartment to maintain rigidity. "Our car is just as stiff as the coupe" was the claim by Ernst Berg in Sport Auto, and a copy of a period drawing on file shows the structure of this bracing, a properly engineered undertaking adding only 50kg to the cars weight. It is reported to drive very well. The removeable roof panels were first finished in body colored Giallo before it was realized they would be better protected from scratches and light damage when removed by covering in a similar material to that used on the contemporary 328 GTS.

Factory-built to European specification in 1985 (there was no US version at the time), and ordered via the Belgian Garage Francorchamps dealership, this car is one of the rare and desirable Monospecchio examples with the single wing mirror and Monodado center-lock wheels, finished in Giallo. It is understood that the car was modified to meet local requirements when it arrived in the USA, hence the side repeaters. First registered on Belgian plates as 'DTF.425', it featured in several motoring magazines immediately after conversion and in November 1985 appeared on the front cover of Sport Auto. In Sport Auto it was noted that this car (at 270,000 Marks) was the most expensive open car in the world at the time.

The accompanying Carfax notes that the car was in Washington in 1991, with further inspections there in 1997, 1999 and 2005. A change of owner is noted in 2001. In 2006 the Ferrari was offered for sale online and the Carfax notes that in early 2008 the car made its way to Hawaii, where it stayed until late 2012 when it was offered again for sale in California where it was purchased by the current owner, a UK-based Ferrari Owners' Club member, shipped to the UK, and registered as 'B183 FNO'. He kept the Testarossa for a few years before selling it to a doctor, who subsequently went to work in Australia having commissioned major works to the car, only to get stuck abroad due to Covid travel restrictions. The current vendor repurchased the car from him in 2020 and completed the work, which was undertaken by Grimaldi Engineering. This included an extensive engine rebuild; an interior replacement in black leather; and fitting new wheels to take modern tires (the original faded cream interior and original wheels are included in the sale). The total invoices on file for this amount to more than £82,000 (circa $100,000). The current odometer reading is a circa 55,600km (34,500 miles), meaning it has covered less than 200 miles since the engine rebuild. The body and paintwork are understood to remain largely original.

A wonderful opportunity to own and enjoy a unique open Ferrari, epitomizing the excess of the 1980s, guaranteed to turn heads at any gathering of 'Prancing Horse' enthusiasts, featured in several magazines and noted as the most expensive open top car in the world when new.

[ translate ]
Estimate
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Time, Location
04 May 2024
USA, Miami, FL
Auction House
Unlock